Chanter Reed Issues

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  • Back D Discussions

Low Notes too Sharp (Chanter)

  • Reed head is too wide. (Hegarty)

Back "D" Breaks (Chanter)

  • Reed head is too wide. (Hegarty)

Back "D" is Sharp (Chanter)

  • Reed head is too narrow. (Hegarty)

Upper Octave is Difficult to Sustain (Chanter)

  • Reed head is too wide. (Hegarty)

Back D is flat (Chanter)

  • Push reed deeper into the chanter, or adjust collar, or trim blades, or all three. (Sky)

    Sky

Head Size (Chanter)

  • Wide head is flatter than narrow head. (Hegarty)

  • Longer is flatter than shorter. (Hegarty)

  • Reed w/ narrow head suits narrow bore pipe. (Hegarty)

Bore Size (Chanter)

  • Narrow bore is flatter than wider for the same length. (Hegarty)

  • The narrower the bore and consequently the less the volume of the chanter bore, the smaller the diameter of the staple of the reed most likely to fit well and produce a proper scale of notes. (Hegarty)

Head Size Width for Wide Bore (Chanter)

  • Reed w/ wide head suits wide bore pipe. (Hegarty)

Head Size Width vs. Bore (Chanter)

  • In no instance should the width of the head be greater than the bore at the bottom (wide end) of the chanter. (Concurred by Koehler) (Hegarty)

Scrape (Chanter)

  • Reed scrape shape influences overall tone. (No specifics given) (Hegarty)

Head Width (Chanter)

  • Width of reed head is a component of internal volume. (Hegarty)

Thinner Blades are Flatter (Chanter)

  • Thinner blades flattens the reed overall, but the second octave flattens compared to the first. (Koehler)